Mastering new home

The initial introduction to your home

Cats need to become thoroughly familiar with new surroundings before they feel comfortable. An entire apartment or house can be overwhelming all at once. Many cats will hide under beds or furniture, sometimes for days. It will be much less stressful for your cat to learn about you, your family and your home a little at a time. This is even more important if there are multiple people and/or pets in your household.

When you bring your cat home, place him in the room you have fixed up for him, keep this room closed off, and let him explore that area first. Let the cat come out of his crate on his own; do not try to coax him or tip the crate to force him out. Cats are curious and most will soon come out to explore their surroundings. If the cat seems very timid, you can leave the room for a while and check back later. If you really want to stay in the room, get a book and read. When the cat is ready to come out, stay where you are and let him come to you. Talk in a soft, reassuring tone, pet him if he seems interested, but do not try to pick him up. Leave the open carrier in the room, so that he has a safe retreat if he wants one. Give him time to learn that he can trust you.

Sleeping

A kitten has two distinct sleep phases:

​Deep sleep:
From birth until eight weeks of age, all sleep is deep and continual, during which essential growth hormones are secreted. At the age of 2 months, the continuity of sleep decreases and your kitten alternates light sleep and deep sleep. During the deep sleep period, you should never wake a kitten as it could affect their growth.

​Light sleep:
Once the kitten is two months old, their sleep rhythm will gradually move towards that of an adult cat – sleeping for several periods for a total of around 16 hours a day. During this light sleep, cats sleep with one ear listening – conscious of even the slightest noise.

The introduction to other family members

Introduce other family members slowly. Have them come into the room one at a time to pet and play with the cat. Have younger children sit down, then show them how to gently stroke the cat's fur and offer her a few treats. Make certain that children understand that they are not to chase the cat, hurt her or bother her while she eats, sleeps or uses the litter box. If there are no other pets, you can let the cat begin to explore the rest of the house in a few days.

Kittens and kids

  • Study up and share

Doing research is important so that everyone understands the commitment involved in caring for an animal. Share any information you gather with your kids and pick up some children's books about pets so your kids will be well informed about the responsibilities of owning a cat.

  • Establish clear rules and boundaries

Set up ground rules right away—for the kitten and the kids—so everyone knows what's expected.

  • Provide age-appropriate supervision

Children under 6 shouldn't be alone with a new kitten—both the child and the kitten can use your guidance at this age. Older kids should demonstrate they know how to be gentle before being left unsupervised.

  • Take it slow

Your kitten will experience less stress if he or she has the opportunity to get to know the new surrounding—and a new family—at a gentle pace. Let your kids know that the family’s new pet needs time to adjust before becoming a playmate.

  • Create a sense of responsibility

Help your kids understand that a pet is more than a playmate—it’s a living creature in need of your care. Demonstrate this need by assigning each child with an adult-supervised pet care duty. For example, one child could assist with feeding, one with providing fresh water. Other jobs could include checking that the kitten’s bedding is clean or making sure toys are always available. Cleaning the litterbox, however, should be left to adults.

New discoveries

When your cat arrives make sure your house is quiet, calm and safe. Remove any possible hazards and ensure everything you need – feeding bowls, accessories, bedding and so on – are in place. Not sure what you need? View our full list of kitten essentials below. Decide in advance where your kitten will eat and sleep – she needs peace and quiet for both, especially in the early days. An out of the way corner is ideal.

If the atmosphere is noisy or disturbed, your kitten could grow into a nervous and fearful adult. The best approach is to move gently without shouting, and to avoid passing the kitten round for everyone to cuddle. Gain your kitten’s trust by keeping her safe.

Your home could be dangerous for a young kitten so check to ensure that potential hazards are kept out of access before your kitten arrives. The list to the right is a useful guide but is not exhaustive so please speak to your vet for further advice on keeping your kitten safe at home

Potential hazards

​• Plastic bags and foam
​• Oven Hobs
​• Balconies
​• Irons
​• Electric wires and sockets
​• Pesticides and weed killers
​• Medicines
​• Small items such as elastic bands and drawing pins
​• Washing machines and tumble dryers
​• Dustbins and toilets (always keep the lid on and the toilet seat down)
​• Some plants can be harmful for cats, avoid Holly, Lillies, Mistletoe, Wisteria, Rhododendron, Ivy and Sweat pea
​• Sewing materials
​• Antifreeze
​• ​Permethrin-based spot-on flea treatments for dogs (avoid contact with treated dogs)

First feeding

Little and often Find out what your kitten is eating before she comes home, and keep her on that for a week or so before you change it. The most important thing to remember in feeding kittens is that their digestive systems are still immature – so they can be prone to upset tummies.

Little and often

Find out what your kitten is eating before she comes home, and keep her on that for a week or so before you change it. The most important thing to remember in feeding kittens is that their digestive systems are still immature – so they can be prone to upset tummies. The best and easiest solution is to feed an ultra-digestible food specially designed for kittens (the kibble size, shape and texture in dry foods are also good for her teeth), and to feed little and often. In the wild, kittens and cats tend to snack, eating up to 20 small meals a day. So using a dry food means you can put the daily portion down (using the guidelines on the pack), and let your kitten feed at will – just as long as you are sure no other pet will snaffle it before she does!

A kitten’s growth takes place in two distinct phases:

  • From birth to 4 months
    During this period the kitten grows very fast. By the end of four months, it will be five to seven times heavier than its birth weight. The kitten’s skeletal structure is also developing at this time and its energy needs are very high.

  • From 4 months to 12 months
    ​At this point, the kitten’s growth slows down. This allows the skeleton to strengthen and muscles to develop. Energy requirements remain very high.

Teeth

Kittens have two sets of teeth – the first, the milk teeth, appear at around two weeks of age. The final set of teeth will be in place at the beginning of the second stage of growth, between 4 and 6 months.

Digestive ability

When a kitten is born, its digestive system is not fully developed and therefore its food must be specially formulated to ensure digestive safety. The kitten’s digestive ability increases over time.

Immune system

Between the 4th and 12th week of life, the kitten is particularly vulnerable to infectious diseases as its immune system is not yet fully functional, and the immunity gained from its mother’s milk is decreasing.

Dangerous Houseplants for Cats

​There are many plants you may bring into your home without realising that they are poisonous to cats. Not all of them will prove fatal if eaten or chewed, but some most definitely can kill your much loved cat. Never assume a cat will instinctively not try and eat a poisonous plant, as all too often cats end up being rushed into the vets suffering from poisoning as a result of chewing on or eating a number of different houseplants. Those of you who read my previous hub about the dangers of Lilies to your cats will know what I am talking about here.

In this article I hope to list most of the more common houseplants that are dangerous to cats so that you can either ensure you don't bring them into your home or at least you can keep them out of the reach of your pets. I am guessing that many of the plants on this list will come as quite a surprise to you:

​• Asparagus Fern
​• Corn Plant
​• Dieffenbachia
​• Elephant Ear
​• Lilies
​• Cyclamen
​• Heartleaf Philodendron
​• Jade Plant
​• Aloe Plant
​• ​Satin Potho


 




How to choose a kitten?

The appearance of a kitten in a new home

Mastering new home

Behavior of the Bengal breed cats

Health and Heredity of the Bengal breed

Бенгальские кошки, Бенгальская кошка, Бенгальский кот, Бенгальский котенок с родословной, купить бенгальского котенка с родословной, особенности бенгальской породы кошек, стоимость Бенгальского котенка, Питомник Бенгальских кошек PearlSpots Bengal Cattery Bengaalse kat, bengaalse kat kopen,  bengaalse kat karakter, bengaalse kat prijs, bengaalse kat grootte, bengaalse kater, bengaalse kat cattery, Bengaalkat - Bengaalse Kittens, Bengaal Kittentekoop, de kosten van de Bengaal, PearlSpots Bengal Cattery, Bengalen katten, Bengaal, Bengalen kat karakter, Karakter Bengaalse katten, Bengaalse kattenras, Bengalen kat prijs, de kosten van de Bengaal, kopen Bengaal, kopen Bengaalse kat, beoordelingen over het Bengaalse ras katten, hoeveel is het Bengaalse ras kat, Bengaalse kat, bengaalse kat kopen, bengaalse kat karakter, bengaalse kat prijs, bengaalse kat grootte, bengaalse kater, bengaalse kat cattery, Bengaalkat - Bengaalse Kittens, Bengaal Kittentekoop, PearlSpots Bengal Cattery  kattenras ​​